Greetings Fellow BatCats,
Cliff Jensen has asked me to help him set up a dedicated section of our website for Agent Orange data mining. He has been
getting overwhelmed with emails and files and questions about the subject of and dealing with the Department of Veterans
Affairs since it was reported last August, 2010 that, “Vietnam-era Veterans whose service involved duty on or near the
perimeters of military bases in Thailand may have been exposed to herbicides and may qualify for VA benefits.  U.S. Air Force
Veterans who served on Royal Thai Air Force (RTAF) at U-Tapao, Ubon, Nakhon Phanom, Udorn, Takhli, Korat, and Don Muang,
near the airbase perimeter anytime between February 28, 1961 and May 7, 1975.”
The Dept. of VA further states, “To receive benefits for diseases associated with herbicide exposure, these Veterans must
show on a factual basis that they were exposed to herbicides during their service as shown by evidence of daily work duties,
performance evaluation reports, or other credible evidence.” Sounds simple enough, doesn’t it? Well, the mindset that exists
currently does not have a clear path to granting awards merely by filing a claim. It should be noted that before Thailand was
“opened-up” for AO claims, many Vietnam Vets going back to the 1980’s have met with mixed success in dealing with the VA.
The test we were told about was, “Boots on the Ground in Vietnam or adjacent waterways, etc.” and some BatCats may have
already have shared the experience in submitting claims during TDY or other assignments outside of Thailand . The purpose of
this page is to “drill-down” information that will help us and perhaps open things up for other Veterans that face similar
situations. Once the survey is assimilated and a list of web site addresses is prepared, we will have the collective efforts of the
553rd Recon Wing working and thinking along the same lines. We are planning to have a time set aside during the Orlando
Reunion in the Hotel Meeting Room to discuss this subject in greater depth and are thought is to have a panel of 3 or 4 BatCats
to share their experience with us. Anyone that wishes to ask questions and wants consideration to become a panelist is
entirely welcome. We need the support of members of congress and other elected officials to come to our aid. We need more
classified information to be released and while it is a slow process, it is moving in the right direction.
We want to be careful that we don’t spread false information or rumors that are unfounded. The VA takes a very jaundiced view
(jaundiced is defined as an attitude that is characterized by cynical hostility, resentment, or suspicion) of any data they are
presented with. If we state our facts clearly and respectfully when offering our claims records, we have a chance of breaking
into the compensation award bracket which is pegged between 0%-100%. Logic says if we have the provable diseases
enumerated by the VA and have evidence to support the conditions established and can document it-we have to fall somewhere
between 10% and 100%...So, never give up! Be patient with the VA and make copies of everything you send them along with
dated cover letters that you can easily re-produce and re-forward to mitigate any stalling techniques you may encounter.
Thank You, Bob Langenhan 553 OMS (11/67-11/68)
Bob Langenhan
cavete.cattam@yahoo.com
Larry Westin
westin@tdstelme.net
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Batcat "Godfather"
Batcat Benefit Investigator
Getting the word out
Sent to Megyn Kelly of Fox News
Megyn kelly
kelly@foxnews.com
Dear Megyn,
I watch the Fox News Reports as my preferred source of current and world events.
On today’s show (March 18, 2011) it was reported that measuring the potential radioactive fallout in Southern California from the Japanese nuclear reactors was for the most part
based on scientific measurements to assuage the population from panicking and reaching flawed conclusions. “It’s a billion times less…”
As a Vietnam Veteran serving at an airbase in Korat, Thailand, in the mid-1960’s there were herbicides that were cast down on our enemies from aircraft meant only to destroy
crops and kill jungle growth in Vietnam and other specified areas of conflict. The usage was broadened to include perimeters of military bases in Thailand and ammo storage areas
as a means of improving security and combating insurgents. 55 gallon drums of various Rainbow Herbicides including Agent Orange were stored in our vicinity and we were
never told about it; tests were conducted prior to usage and the government was assured the exposure to humans and/or animals was very similar to the reports I hear about the
recent radioactive fallout. Actually, we had no reports or knowledge of the chemicals being used.
Do you see the parallel implications I am illustrating?
Some 40 plus years after serving our country, many Vietnam-era Veterans are suffering from various forms of cancer, heart disease, and Diabetes Type Two that has been linked
to the toxins contained in the herbicides that were approved during the war years.
In the 1960’s when Thailand gave the U.S. permission to build military bases as strategic airfields to conduct military operations over Vietnam , these herbicides were used when
the land was being plowed level before the runways and hangars were constructed. How do you think the empty barrels of “toxic juice” were ultimately disposed of? Empty
barrels and leaking barrels were either fed into holding pools to evaporate and were plowed over with dirt. Some of the barrels with their Agent Orange markings on the outside
were cut in half and used as barbeques…this must be common practice in Third World countries, I guess? Check out the Department of the Army, Headquarters, Washington , DC
, FM-No. 3-3 “Field Manual: Tactical Employment of Herbicides” issued December, 1971 especially Chapters 5 and 6 about applying and disposing of spent or leaking barrels.
Those people (SEA) were left there to live among the pollution while back home we were enacting Pollution policies (Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1970) and creating an
agency called EPA. The Thai and Vietnamese have had to endure generations of cancers and birth defects that still affect them. The EPA can’t help them with a Superfund to pay
claims. Maybe you can read Connie Schultz reports (six articles) in the Cleveland Plain Dealer when you get a chance?
My own personal point of view is this is still kept under wraps and veterans are being denied compensation and disability payments. Hundreds of thousands of GI’s are suffering,
waiting, and dying for the government to admit we were put into harms way; once it is admitted, I would believe American Veterans AND the Nations of Southeast Asia are owed
reparations for negligent usage, storage, and application of Agent Orange.
So, Megyn, will the residents of Chula Vista find out 40 years from now that the reason all the children on the high school basketball teams are 8 feet tall is due to the radioactive
fallout from the Japanese quake and tsunami back in “Ought-11”?
Perhaps one of your esteemed associates would like to do an in-depth report on the subject of Agent Orange as outlined above? There are a lot of facts that need to get out and
there are many people behind the scenes better equipped than I that are carrying on the battle to get help for our veterans-I am one of the more recent one’s and I am 64. Our motto
is, “Never give up, never give up”.
Respectfully submitted,
Robert G Langenhan
San Rafael, CA
This site provides information related to dioxin and other toxic exposures by personnel of the 553rd Recon Wing Batcats personnel.
We are not lawyers and offer no legal advice. We are not accredited Veteran Service Officers and offer only ideas for you to ponder.
Please see full disclaimer on Home Page.
Disabled American Vets
American Legion
Veterans of Foreign Wars
Vietnam Security Police Assoc.
Vietnam Veterans of America
Larry Westin's Batcat website
Tips on filing VA claims
Click "Agent Orange" in search
Click "Agent Orange" in search
Texas Tech papers on AO
Search "Agent Orange"
IMPORTANT LINKS TO "AGENT ORANGE" AND "HOW TO FILE
WITH THE VA" FROMBOB AND LARRY. CLICK ON BANNER OF
CHOICE.
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Henderson v Shineski
Cliff, you may have seen this on the Korat Yahoo Group. I read it today and while there is a lot of legalese. It may be something to consider posting on our
AO page. The crux of the matter is the 120 day notice for appeal process, but the Supreme Court makes a very concise summary of the typical claims route.
Justice Samuel Alito, Jr. delivered the opinion of the Court on March 1, 2011 and made the following observations:
The VA has a 2 step process for the adjudication of these claims: 1st-the VA regional office receives and processes veteran’s claims and makes initial
decision on whether to grant or deny benefits. 2nd-if a veteran is dissatisfied with the regional office decision; the veteran may obtain a review by the Board
of Veterans Appeals.
The Board of Veterans Appeals is a body within the VA that makes the agency’s final decision in cases appealed to it.
The canon that provisions for benefits to members of the Armed Services are to be construed in the beneficiaries favor.
The VA’s adjudicatory process is designed to function with a high degree of informality and solicitude for the claimant.
The VA has a statutory duty to assist veterans in developing the evidence necessary to substantiate their claims. When evaluating claims, the VA must give
veterans the “benefit of the doubt” whenever positive or negative evidence on a material issue is roughly equal.
If a regional office denies a claim, the veteran has a generous 1 year time limit to initiate an appeal to the Board.
A veteran may also re-open a previously denied claim at anytime by presenting “new and material evidence” and decisions by a regional office or the Board
are subject to challenge at any time based on “clear and unmistakable error”.
Further on---while proceedings before the Veterans Court are adversarial-veterans have a remarkable record of success before that tribunal. Statistics show
that in the last decade the court ordered some form of relief in around 79% of its “merits decisions”.

**************************************************************************

BatCats: the message is it is up to us to connect the dots. It is up to us to search for documents, photographs, eye witnesses’ testimony, and release of
secret and/or confidential files that will provide… incontrovertible proof. Use Justice Alito’s words when you are crafting your claims’ files. Let’s try to work
with the VA and be responsive to their requests and if we conduct ourselves in a professional and truthful manner, we should expect no less in return.
Never give up, never give up. Bob
On Friday 5/6/11, my brother introduced me to Congressman John J. Duncan, Jr. of Knoxville TN. Congressman Duncan listened to the plight of the Batcats in regards to Agent Orange V.A.
claims. He assigned his office manager, Jennifer Stansberry to investigate.  Ms. Stansberry took down all my info in regards to my case and had me sign a release so that she may get my
status from the V.A. No promises were made, but this is a definate step in the right direction. Congressman Duncan and Ms. Stansberry are wonderful people who truley care and will do
whatever they can. My thanks to my brother Russ for arranging this meeting. Will keep you all informed of any updates.   Cliff Jensen
Russ            Congressman           Cliff
Jensen               Duncan              Jensen
Stansberry    Jensen
Recieved 5/19/11
The following data is being posted on our BatCat Websites as a means to assist you in your claims processing with the VA. It is not the intent for you to merely copy the material
and send it to your VA Regional Office-we have here the opportunity to “Connect the Dots” and you can tailor the submission to your specific situation and most importantly
expand it by adding statements from your buddies that will corroborate your history.  

The best way to start the ball rolling is to draft a cover letter addressed to your VA (contact) and list all the enclosures in the order you are submitting it. Keep it simple, straight-
forward, and respectful as if the VA examiner is seeing claims information for the first time.

Let’s start by going over Larry Westin’s Vegetation Control/Toxic Chemicals at Korat RTAFB 1967-1971 dated May 23, 2011:

+Read through the 16 paragraphs at the opening and see if you can envision yourself in any of them?

+Flight Crew and Ground Crew can tap into many of the items: spent time on the flight line, played at the Recreation/Softball field, rode the bus to/from town, lived in the
hootches, etc.

+Here is where you need your creativity: check any statements, orders, or pictures you have in your files and expand it to your advantage.

+Check if you have any performance reports detailing your duties while at Korat or other Thai bases where exposure was prevalent.

+Reach out to members of the BatCat community that can offer statements of verification. (Suggest using VA Form 21-4138 as it more official than a yellow lined page).

+Look at the maps and think about where you were in relation to the perimeter. We have to put ourselves at or on or near the perimeter and we were not air police or K-9
handlers.
Many of us were trained to perform guard duty (without orders) and am sure you can verify this with a buddy and perhaps write each other’s statement.(Remember 21-4138!)

+Did anyone who ventured onto the flight line for the purposes of flying or turning a wrench EVER take a smoke break? You didn’t stand under a wing with 3000 gallons of
115/135 AvGas over your head…you walked over to the PERIMETER at he edge of the concrete or stood in the soft dirt behind the triple tail and when you were done, you
field-stripped your cigarette-leaving no evidence you were ever there!
+Did any ground troop on night shift ever relieve himself into the concertina wire at the end of the flight line after several hours of consuming several cups of black coffee
between fuelling, launching, or towing aircraft?

+Look at pictures shown after maps-if you have anything to add or comment: Now is the time and place.

OK, next item. Declassified Data AFHRA.

This is a series of pages that reference the need for Defoliation at Korat RTAFB for security reasons, etc. Mention in your cover letter that these are attached and
let it assimilate into the VA examiner’s head.


Personally, I think it’s a good thing to remind the VA examiner what this is all about; attached is a list of Presumptive Diseases connected to exposure to Agent
Orange/Herbicides/Toxic Chemicals:  
Agent Orange Presumptive Condition
1. Acute and Sub-acute Peripheral Neuropathy
2. Angiosarcoma
3. Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma
4. Adult Fibrosarcoma
5. B-Cell Leukemias
6. Bone Pain
7. Chloracne
8. Clear Cell Sarcoma of Aponeuroses
9. Clear Cell Sarcoma of Tendons and Aponeuroses
10. Congenital Fibrosarcoma
11. Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans
12. Ectomesenchymoma
13. Epithelioid Malignant Leiomyosarcoma
14. Epithelioid and Grandular Malignant Schwannomas
15. Epithelioid Sarcoma
16. Extraskeletal Ewing’s Sarcoma
17. Hemangiosarcoma
18. Hodgkin’s Disease
19. Infantile Fibrosarcoma
20. Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD)
21. Leiomyosarcoma
22. Liposarcoma
23. Lymphangiosarcoma
24. Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma
25. Malignant Ganglioneuroma
26. Malignant Giant Cell Tumor of the Tendon Sheath
27. Malignant Glandular Schwannoma
28. Malignant Granular Cell Tumor
29. Malignant Hemangiopericytoma
30. Malignant Leiomyoblastoma
31. Malignant Mesenchymoma
32. Malignant Schwannoma with Rhabdomyoblastic Differentiation
33. Malignant Synovioma
34. Multiple Myeloma
35. Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma
36. Parkinson's Disease
37. Porphyria Cutanea Tarda
38. Proliferating (systemic) Angiendotheliomatosis
39. Prostate Cancer
40. Respiratory Cancer
41. Rhabdomyosarcoma
42. Synovial Sarcoma
43. Type II Diabetes
Assume you have already obtained any and all medical records associated with the above diseases and provided documents to the VA………………………..
APRIL 2011
IN THE APPEAL OF: NAME OF PLANTIFF DELETED FROM THIS WEB SITE TO PROTECT HIS PRIVACY
C. Diabetes Mellitus: The Veteran asserts that he has diabetes mellitus as the result of his active military service. He concedes that diabetes mellitus manifested
after his periods of service. Specifically, the Veteran testified that he was initially diagnosed with diabetes mellitus in 2004. Post-service medical records also
document that he was first diagnosed with diabetes mellitus in 2004. Nevertheless, the Veteran contends that service connection is warranted for diabetes mellitus
due to in-service exposure to herbicide agents, such as Agent Orange. Specifically, he states that he was exposed to such agents when he was stationed at Udorn
Royal Thai Air Force Base (RTAFB) in Thailand during the Vietnam era. The Veteran alleges that herbicides were used at the base, particularly on the perimeter to
control jungle vegetation. He states that the performance of his duties regularly placed him near the perimeter of the base. The Veteran maintains that any current
diabetes mellitus should be presumed to be related to the in-service exposure to herbicide agents in a similar manner as it is for service members who were
stationed within the borders of the Republic of Vietnam. As previously noted, the regulations pertaining to veterans exposed to herbicide agents generally require
service within the land borders of Vietnam. The United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit has upheld VA's longstanding interpretation of the regulation
requiring the presence of a service member at some point on the land mass or inland waters of Vietnam in order to benefit from the presumption. Haas v. Peake,
525 F .3d 1168 (Fed. Cir. 2008), cert. denied, 1002 (2009). In the Veteran's case he has not indicated that he had service in Vietnam, and his service records do not
show that he served within the land borders of Vietnam. Recently, VA's Compensation & Pension Service (C&P) has issued information concerning the use of
herbicides in Thailand during the Vietnam War. In a May 2010 bullet in, C&P indicated that it has determined that there was significant use of herbicides on the
fenced in perimeters of military bases in Thailand intended to eliminate vegetation and ground cover for base security purposes. A primary source for this
information was the declassified Vietnam era Department of Defense (DOD) document titled Project CHECO Southeast Asia Report: Based Defense in Thailand.
Although DOD indicated that the herbicide use was commercial in nature rather than tactical (such as Agent Orange), C&P has determined that there was some
evidence that herbicides of a tactical nature, or that of a "greater strength" commercial variant, were used. Given this information, C&P has determined that special
consideration should be given to veterans whose duties placed them on or near the perimeters of Thailand military bases. Consideration of herbicide exposure on
a "facts found or direct basis" should be extended to those veterans. Significantly, C&P stated that "[t]his allows for presumptive service connection of the
diseases associated with herbicide exposure." The May 2010 bulletin identifies several bases in Thailand, including Udorn RTAFB. C&P indicated that herbicide
exposure should be acknowledged on a facts found or direct basis if a United States Air Force veteran served at one of the air bases as a security policeman, a
security patrol dog handler, a member of a security police squadron, or otherwise served near the air base perimeter, as shown by MOS, performance evaluations,
or other credible evidence. The Veteran's service records expressly show that he was stationed at Udorn RTAFB during the Vietnam War. Although he had an
MOS of security supervisor during service, this was the case after his service at Udorn. When he was stationed there, his MOS was an aircraft inertial and radar
systems repairman. November 1970 performance report characterized the MOS as aircraft radar and inertial navigation systems equipment repairman. Specifically,
the Veteran performed postflight, periodic, scheduled modifications, and unscheduled maintenance on inertial navigation and radar systems installed on RF-4C and
F-4D aircraft. Thus the evidence does not show that the Veteran was a security policeman, a security patrol dog handler, or a member of a security police
squadron when he was stationed at Udorn. Indeed, he does not claim that he walked the perimeter of the base as a guard. Instead, the Veteran testified that he
was regularly in close proximity of the perimeter in the performance of his duties. The Veteran has submitted substantial research material in support of his
contention that he was exposed to herbicides at Udorn RTAFB. This evidence includes annotated maps and photographs showing the areas of the base in which
he performed his aircraft maintenance duties, including areas near the perimeter. In addition, the Veteran submitted statements from fellow service members. S.D.
P. described Udorn from the time period from 1968 to 1969 and noted that the vegetation died off after heavy spraying from barrels. J.C.K. indicated that he worked
in a shop within a hundred feet of the Veteran's shop at Udorn and recalled witnessing spraying around the shops and flight line to control vegetation. He stated
that some of the base in the jungle looked like the desert. D.E.D. also recalled being stationed at Udorn at the same time as the Veteran and indicated that there
was no foliage along the perimeter even though they were located in a jungle. D.E.D. further noted that aircraft technicians such as the Veteran and himself
worked within a few feet of the base perimeter. In addition, L.M.T. stated that he was stationed at Udorn in 1970 and 1971 and worked with the Veteran on aircraft
maintenance. L.M.T. recalled that much of the maintenance was not conducted in hangars. Instead, the aircraft were located on the flight line and were regularly
parked near the base perimeter. Moreover, E.L.G. stated that the Veteran worked under his supervision at Udorn and noted that the Veteran spent long hours on
the flight line maintaining aircraft. He indicated that the Veteran spent very little time in the shop areas. T.L.E., who was also stationed at Udorn with the Veteran,
similarly recalled that much of the aircraft maintenance took place on the flight line and rarely in a hangar. L.M.P. stated that he was stationed at Udorn from 1965 to
1969. L.M.P., D.L.E., and A.B.C. each recalled witnessing defoliant spraying around the perimeter of the base at Udorn.
Given the research evidence submitted by the Veteran, the numerous statements from fellow service members, and the Veteran's seemingly credible testimony, it
appears that the Veteran likely performed his duties or otherwise served near the air base perimeter at Udorn RTAFB. There is no explicit evidence that he was
exposed to herbicide agents.
In addition, the Veteran submitted statements from fellow service members. S.D.P. described Udorn from the time period from 1968 to 1969 and noted that the
vegetation died off after heavy spraying from barrels. J.C.K. indicated that he worked in a shop within a hundred feet of the Veteran's shop at Udorn and recalled
witnessing spraying around the shops and flight line to control vegetation. He stated that some of the base in the jungle looked like the desert. D.E.D. also recalled
being stationed at Udorn at the same time as the Veteran and indicated that there was no foliage along the perimeter even though they were located in a jungle.
D.E.D. further noted that aircraft technicians such as the Veteran and himself worked within a few feet of the base perimeter. In addition, L.M.T. stated that he was
stationed at Udorn in 1970 and 1971 and worked with the Veteran on aircraft maintenance. L.M.T. recalled that much of the maintenance was not conducted in
hangars. Instead, the aircraft were located on the flight line and were regularly parked near the base perimeter.
Moreover, E.L.G. stated that the Veteran worked under his supervision at Udorn and noted that the Veteran spent long hours on the flight line maintaining aircraft.
He indicated that the Veteran spent very little time in the shop areas. T.L.E., who was also stationed at Udorn with the Veteran, similarly recalled that much of the
aircraft maintenance took place on the flight line and rarely in a hangar. L.M.P. stated that he was stationed at Udorn from 1965 to 1969. L.M.P., D.L.E., and A.B.C.
each recalled witnessing defoliant spraying around the perimeter of the base at Udorn.
Given the research evidence submitted by the Veteran, the numerous statements from fellow service members, and the Veteran's seemingly credible testimony, it
appears that the Veteran likely performed his duties or otherwise served near the air base perimeter at Udorn RTAFB. There is no explicit evidence that he was
exposed to herbicide agents.
As previously noted, the post-service medical evidence shows that the Veteran has type II diabetes mellitus. That disorder is listed as a disease associated with
exposure to herbicide agents. See 38 C.F.R. § 3.309(e). There is no affirmative evidence showing that the Veteran's diabetes mellitus was not caused by his
exposure to herbicide agents. In fact, in February 2010, Dr. R.E.L. opined that it is more likely than not that the Veteran's contraction of diabetes was secondary to
his exposure to herbicides during active military service.
In view of this evidence, the Board finds that the Veteran has diabetes mellitus that is attributable to his active
military service. Therefore, the Board concludes that service connection is warranted for diabetes mellitus. See 38
U.S.CA. § 1116; 38 C.F.R.§§ 3.307, 3.309.
OK, time to get back to connecting the dots. The above statement clearly shows that the Board has made a decision that “a veteran” was exposed to herbicide
agents while stationed in Thailand during the Vietnam era.  Furthermore, the Board concludes that Diabetes Mellitus is attributable to his military service.
Now, armed with the above information, if you can document your claim to offer evidence that places you in a similar position with supporting evidence, it is
hopeful that you will have a successful outcome for the applicable diseases listed by the VA. When your letter is complete, make copies of everything and mail
off the originals. My experience has been the VA will acknowledge your submission or any supplemental information in 4-5 weeks. Never give up, never give up.
To print these documents,
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Listen to Jim Eaton's "A Veteran's
Story". See the parallel to our fight?
Thank you so much, Jim for this
wonderful, insightful story. And God
Bless and good luck to Pat.
Click on Jim's picture
Agent Orange claim filing deadline Aug. 30
Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr. CollectionVietnam-era veterans who have medical diagnoses for three presumptive conditions related to Agent Orange exposure need to file their disability claims with the
Department of Veterans Affairs by Aug. 30 in order to qualify for up to one year of retroactive benefits. The three diseases recently added to VA's list of presumptive conditions related to Agent Orange
exposure or other herbicides during the Vietnam War are ischemic heart disease, hairy cell and other B-cell leukemias, and Parkinson's disease. "Veterans who suffer from these presumptive conditions can
apply for disability benefits at any time," said Verna Jones, director of The American Legion's Veterans Affairs & Rehabilitation Division. "But they need to apply by the Aug. 30 deadline in order to possibly
get up to a year's worth of benefits retroactively, "Widows and widowers whose spouses have died from Agent Orange presumptive conditions may also qualify for retroactive benefits and are encouraged
to file for dependent indemnity compensation by Aug. 30. Veterans can file for disability claims online at VA's Agent Orange Fast Track Claims Processing System.

I live in Tennessee and I do not know how the other states operate as far a Service Officers. In the State of Tennessee, the State of Tennessee Department of Veterans Affairs Office works with each county
to provide trained, certified Veteran Service Officers. Once certified, the Service Officer must recertify every year, which is done through testing. That Service Officer may also apply and be certified through
any of the following organizations as well: American Legion, VFW, DAV, etc. These organzations provide their own testing and certifications. I saw the comment from the veteran in Colorado concerning his
brother and I would suggest you check with the Department of Veterans Affairs website (va.gov) and try to locate someone in your state to contact. OR you can file online yourself as one gentleman
suggested. My husband is a Veterans Service Officer in our county here in Tennessee and is certified through the American Legion as well.
From the 2011 Reunion in Orlando, County Veterans Service Reps
Invited guest speakers for reunion. Please see disclaimer in red letters to the
right.>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
David Donohew
Mike Dixon
Last Updated: 2/5/12